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"Alpronovsofi"

The following is an ongoing exploration of a word I made up, I think. It's full translation in English would be something like: When a thing (emotion, thought, object, etc.) was originally imagined to be intended for one purpose, and then later from knowledge-gained-through-hindsight is discovered to be better suited for another purpose entirely. This situation also implies that there is some sort of a ’discovery’, or revelatory aspect to this moment of realization as well.


I’m sure it’s not lost on any linguist, especially of the English language, that English has few words or phrases that adequately encapsulate complex emotions or situations compared to other languages. German, for instance, seems to be overflowing with words (albeit very long words..) that describe very specific and sometimes complex situations. A few examples:


Torschlusspanik: “Combining "Tor" (gate), "Schluss" (closing), and "Panik" (panic), this term describes the fear of diminishing opportunities as one gets older, often used in the context of feeling the biological clock ticking or the fear of missing out on life's opportunities”

Lebensabschnittspartner: “This compound word is made up of Lebensabschnitt (life segment) and Partner (partner), translating to "life segment partner." It refers to someone significant in one's life for a period or segment of life, but not necessarily for one’s entire life.”


Waldeinsamkeit: “This describes the feeling of solitude, contemplation, and connection to nature that one experiences when alone in the woods. It's not necessarily a negative feeling but rather a peaceful solitude and deep connection to nature.”


I’ve always thought this to be such a needlessly missing facet of the English language. It’s obviously possible to string multiple words together into a phrase that has a similar meaning to these words above, but something about that seems less succinct and meaningful to me. I have read translations of single words from other languages into english and felt so amazed that there are actually words for such complex emotional situations that I have felt at certain times in my life.


When writing the descriptive text for the Ante Publicum (Latin: "Before Public") section for this website, I was describing a situation that felt like it should have its own word, or, maybe that it already does in a different language than English. The specific situation is this: When a thing, emotion, thought, (etc.) was imagined to be intended for one purpose, and then later from knowledge-gained-through-hindsight is discovered to be better suited for another purpose entirely. This situation also implies that there is some sort of a ’discovery’, or revelatory aspect to this moment of realization as well. For instance, in my specific situation described on the Ante Publicum page, I create and design objects and art very “off the cuff” at times. The impetus for them may be a yet-explored conceptual idea, or new material and/or fabrication processes, or any number of things. The point is that these objects almost never have a completely fleshed-out home in a conceptual or even fully ideated sense when they are initially conceived and fabricated. Sometimes, they stay that way. They can be interesting objects for their own phenomenological or aesthetic reasons, or, they can hint at further modes of new concept or thought. At several points in my creative process, weeks, months, or years down the line, I have come to the realization that said example-object from previous text actually has a purpose or meaning different that what I originally intended, and I just didn’t *realize* it until now. This post-realization often comes from new knowledge gained between the object’s inception to now- arbitrary of the object itself - or, in directly-related hindsight to the object itself.


So anyways I’m making up a word for this in English because there is no equivalent word currently available. Looking to Latin as root-inspiration for this new word’s etymological, phonetic, and aesthetic synthesis, I find the following crumbs: (cgpt-4)


‘Mutare’ - to change; to replace (action)

‘Mutatio’ - change

‘Ad Propositum’ - to the purpose; for the intended purpose

- ‘Ad’ - for; towards

- ‘Propositum’ derived from Proponere, meaning: to put forth; to intend


—> ‘Mutare Propositum’ - change the purpose, change the intention

—> ‘Post Factum Cognitio’ - knowledge after the fact a

- ‘Post Factum’ - after the fact

- ‘Cognitio’ - related to knowledge or recognition

—> Post Eventum Sapientia’ - wisdom after the event

- ‘Eventum’ event; the event

- ‘Post Eventum’ after the event

- ‘Sapientia’ wisdom


So from this further insight from Latin, it seems the words I would be most interested in for this purpose would be:

Mutare, Propositum, Sapientia, and Eventum (Post)

I think the most literal interpretation would be something like: “Mutare Propositum Post Eventum” - whose literal translation would seem to be: ‘Changing the purpose after the event’ with a variation as “Mutare Propositum Post Factum” - as, “Changing the purpose after the fact”. However having a string of Latin words isn’t really any different than having a string of English words, so a synthesis must be made for the intended goal!

However before doing so we can also look to Greek etymological references to inform the composition of this new word. Greek and Latin can be combined into ‘Hybrid’ words, of which English is full of. Examples: (wiki)

‘Quadraphonic’ – from the Latin quattuor meaning four and the Greek φωνικός (phōnikós), from φωνή (phōnḗ) meaning sound

'Neuroscience’ – from the Greek νεῦρον (neuron) 'sinew', and the Latin scientia, from sciens 'having knowledge'

‘Polyamory’ – from the Greek πολύς (polýs) 'many' and the Latin amor 'love'

‘Hyperactive’ – from Greek ὑπέρ (hyper) 'over' and Latin activus


So, looking into the Greek translation of some of our focus words, we get: (cgpt-4)

Event - Γεγονός (Gegonós)

Fact - Γεγονός (Gegonós) or Πραγματικότητα (Pragmatikótita)

Knowledge - Γνώση (Gnósi)

Insight - Διορατικότητα (Dioratikótita) or Ενόραση (Enórasi)

Wisdom - Σοφία (Sofía)

Hindsight - Εκ του αποτελέσματος (Ek tou apotelesmatos), which literally translates as "from the outcome"

After - Μετά (Metá)

Changing - Αλλαγή (Allagí)

Purpose - Σκοπός (Skopós)

Intention - Πρόθεση (Próthesi)


From these I am most drawn to ’Sofia’, meaning Wisdom. Both because “Wisdom after the fact”, or “Wisdom after the event” seem like concise phrases for a portion of what I’m speaking about, but also because my Polish Grandmother’s name was Sophie.

So, getting closer to at least finding the concise phrase I am ultimately looking to synthesize a word from:

Wisdom after the event leading to a change of purpose

- or -

Wisdom after the fact leading to a change of intention


Both of these would involved some synthesis of the following Greek and Latin words:

Sofia (wisdom)

Meta (after)

Allagi (changing)

Skopos (purpose)

Prothesi (Intention)

Mutare (to change)

Mutatio (change)

Ad Propositum (to the purpose; for the intended purpose

Mutare Propositum (change the purpose, change the intention)

Post Factum Cognitio (knowledge after the fact)

Post Eventum Sapientia (wisdom after the event)

Eventum (event; the event)

Sapientia (wisdom)


Synthesis experimentation: (cgpt-4 synthesis reference shown)

"mutarproposofitum"

(literal question posed: “Define: Mutar-Propo-Sof-Itum”)

The term "mutar-propo-sof-itum" isn't a recognized term in any standard reference or within my training data up to January 2022. However, I can attempt an interpretation based on its apparent components

Mutar: This is reminiscent of "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Sof: This seems like a short form or variant of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Itum: "Itum" can be related to the Latin verb "ire" (to go), and in some contexts, "-itum" can denote the result or the act of doing something.

Piecing it together, "mutar-propo-sof-itum" could be interpreted as "the act or result of proposing a change to wisdom" or "the path of changing through proposed wisdom."


"proposophimutarism"

(literal question posed: “Define: propo-sophi-mutar-ism”)

"Propo-sophi-mutarism" is not a recognized term in standard English dictionaries, academic literature, or within my training data as of January 2022. However, I can try to interpret it based on the components you've provided:

Propo: This might derive from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Sophi: This is likely from "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Mutar: Appears to be related to "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

-ism: A suffix often used to denote a doctrine, system, philosophy, or practice.

Taken together, "propo-sophi-mutarism" might suggest a doctrine or belief system centered on the idea of "proposing or advocating for the change of wisdom" or "the wisdom of change."


"proposophimutarianism"

(literal question posed: “Define: propo-sophi-mutar-ianism”)

"Propo-sophi-mutar-ianism" is not a recognized term in standard English dictionaries, academic literature, or within my training data as of January 2022. But let's deconstruct the term based on its apparent components:

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Sophi: This is reminiscent of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Mutar: Could be related to "mutare" from Latin, meaning "to change."

-ianism: A suffix often denoting a doctrine, system, philosophy, or practice.

Combining these components, "propo-sophi-mutar-ianism" might indicate a doctrine, system, or belief that centers on the idea of "proposing or advocating for the wisdom of change" or "the wisdom of proposing changes."


"mutarproposofi"

(literal question posed: “Define: mutar-propo-sofi”)

The term "mutar-propo-sofi" isn't recognized in any standard reference or within my training data as of January 2022. However, using its components, I can attempt an interpretation:

Mutar: This is reminiscent of "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Sofi: This seems like a shortened form of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Piecing it together, "mutar-propo-sofi" could imply "proposing changes in wisdom" or "the wisdom of change proposals."


"mutarpropodesofi"

(literal question posed: “Define: mutar-propo-de-sofi”)

The term "mutar-propo-de-sofi" isn't recognized in standard references or within my training data as of January 2022. However, I can attempt an interpretation based on its apparent components:

Mutar: This resembles "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

De: In several languages, "de" can signify possession, derivation, or a component of. In Spanish and Latin, for instance, it often translates as "of" or "from."

Sofi: This might be a shortened form of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Combining these interpretations, "mutar-propo-de-sofi" could be construed to mean "a proposal of change from wisdom" or "changing ideas derived from wisdom.”


"mutarpropodenovisofi"

(literal question posed: “Define: mutar-propo-de-novi-sofi”)

The term "mutar-propo-de-novi-sofi" is not a recognized term in any standard reference or within my training data up to January 2022. However, based on the components you've provided, I can attempt an interpretation:

Mutar: This seems to derive from "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion

De: In many languages, "de" can signify possession, derivation, or a component of. In Latin and Spanish, for example, it often translates as "of" or "from."

Novi: This seems related to the Latin word "novus," meaning "new."

Sofi: Likely a shortened form or variant of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Piecing it together, "mutar-propo-de-novi-sofi" might imply "a proposal of change derived from new wisdom" or "proposing changes based on new insights or wisdom."


"mutarproponovisof"

(literal question posed: “Define: mutar-propo-novi-sof”)

The term "mutar-propo-novi-sof" isn't recognized in standard references or within my training data up to January 2022. Still, I can provide an interpretation based on the components you've presented:

Mutar: Seems to derive from "mutare" from Latin, which means "to change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Novi: Appears to be related to the Latin word "novus," meaning "new."

Sof: Likely a short form or variant of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Combining these elements, "mutar-propo-novi-sof" could be construed to mean "proposing changes based on new wisdom" or "the act of suggesting changes rooted in newfound wisdom."


So, following this etymological journey with CGPT-4, we come to a possible synthesis of my proposed word:

“Mutarproponovisof”

or, instead of the latin word for change, Mutar, the synthesis with the Greek word for change would be


“Allaproponovisof”

(literal question posed: “Define: Alla-propo-novi-sof”)

The term "alla-propo-novi-sof" isn't recognized in standard references or within my training data up to January 2022. However, I can provide a speculative interpretation based on the components you've presented:

Alla: Derived from "αλλαγή" (pronounced "allagí"), which is the Greek word for "change."

Propo: Likely derived from "propose" or "proposal," suggesting the act of putting forward an idea or suggestion.

Novi: Related to the Latin word "novus," meaning "new."

Sof: Likely a short form or variant of "sophia," the Greek term for "wisdom."

Piecing it together, "alla-propo-novi-sof" could be interpreted as "proposing changes based on new wisdom" or "the suggestion of transformations rooted in newfound wisdom."


Other possible variations:

Allaproponovisof

Allapropnovisof

Alpropnovisof

Alpronovisof

Alpronovsofi

Propallanovisof

Novipropallasof

Propanovisof

Prallovidesophi

Mutaproposteventum (all Latin)


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